Boehner gives tough talk to tea party; House votes to ease federal spending
by David Espo, AP Special Correspondent
December 13, 2013 12:33 AM | 474 views | 0 0 comments | 5 5 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio) emerges from a closed-door GOP meeting to announce that House Republicans will advance legislation to temporarily extend the government’s ability to borrow money to meet its financial obligations, at the Capitol in Washington on Thursday. <br>The Associated Press
Speaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio) emerges from a closed-door GOP meeting to announce that House Republicans will advance legislation to temporarily extend the government’s ability to borrow money to meet its financial obligations, at the Capitol in Washington on Thursday.
The Associated Press
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WASHINGTON — Battle-fatigued and suddenly bipartisan, the House voted Thursday night to ease across-the-board federal spending cuts and head off future government shutdowns, acting after Speaker John Boehner unleashed a stinging attack on tea party-aligned conservative groups campaigning for the measure’s defeat.

The legislation, backed by the White House, cleared on a vote of 332-94, with lopsided majorities of Republicans and Democrats alike voting in favor. Final passage is expected next week in the Senate.

The events in the House gave a light coating of bipartisan cooperation to the end of a bruising year of divided government — memorable for a partial government shutdown, flirtation with an unprecedented Treasury default and gridlock on immigration, gun control and other items on President Barack Obama’s second-term agenda.

Obama’s press secretary, Jay Carney, hailed the vote, saying it “shows Washington can and should stop governing by crisis and both sides can work together to get things done.”

Minutes after the budget action, the House approved a broad military policy bill that aims to curb sexual assaults, cover combat pay for U.S. forces and fund new aircraft and ships. That vote, too, was lopsided, 350-69, sending the bill to the Senate, which plans to adjourn for the year next week.

In the end, the budget debate in the House was tame by comparison with Boehner’s criticism of Republican-favoring outside groups that at times have been more of an obstacle to him than Democrats.

“I think they’re misleading their followers,” the Republican speaker said of the groups, whom he pointedly also blamed for last fall’s politically damaging partial government shutdown. “I think they’re pushing our members in places where they don’t want to be. And frankly, I just think that they’ve lost all credibility” by opposing legislation before the details are known.”

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