Farm Bureau looking to grow
by Ashley Fuller
afuller@cherokeetribune.com
November 04, 2010 12:00 AM | 1577 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
The Cherokee County Farm Bureau elected new officers during its annual meeting this week, including, from left, Director Cathy Dobson of Canton, President William Grizzle of Hickory Flat and Director Tim Stewart of Canton. Not pictured: Vice President B.J. Weeks of Ball Ground and Director Scott Cagle of Canton. The bureau will focus its efforts on education this year and plans to start a garden at Free Home Elementary School.<br>Cherokee Tribune/Ashley Fuller
The Cherokee County Farm Bureau elected new officers during its annual meeting this week, including, from left, Director Cathy Dobson of Canton, President William Grizzle of Hickory Flat and Director Tim Stewart of Canton. Not pictured: Vice President B.J. Weeks of Ball Ground and Director Scott Cagle of Canton. The bureau will focus its efforts on education this year and plans to start a garden at Free Home Elementary School.
Cherokee Tribune/Ashley Fuller
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The Cherokee County Farm Bureau is focused on education for the coming year with plans to expand its programs in local schools.

This week the bureau re-elected William Grizzle of Hickory Flat to a second consecutive one-year term as president. Also elected during the bureau's annual meeting was Vice President B.J. Weeks of Ball Ground and directors Scott Cagle of Canton, Cathy Dobson of Ball Ground and Tim Stewart of Canton.

"We are trying to get information out there about agriculture so they can learn something about food production," Grizzle said about the need to increase agricultural education. "We have become a suburban area, and so many people don't know about farming."

Shirley Pahl, program coordinator for the bureau, said a new video produced by the state farm bureau called "Without Farming, Georgia Can't Grow" will be distributed locally to highlight the importance of the industry.

"We will get that into as many schools as we can," she said, adding the video also will be shown to civic organizations and given to local libraries.

Another new initiative is the planting of a garden on the campus of Free Home Elementary School.

Nichelle Stewart of Free Home, chairwoman of the bureau's education committee, said the school already has several raised beds on the grounds that will be used for the fifth-grade project.

The first crops planned are broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and lettuce, with plans to add watermelons.

"Eventually, we will have a full-blown school garden," she said. "Students can get snacks for class and maybe even grow food that the school can use."

Grizzle said he is proud of the bureau's win last year of the McKemie Award in the state bureau's 3,000-plus-member division.

He said the bureau is a finalist again this year for the honor, the highest awarded to a county farm bureau for its overall efforts to promote agriculture in its community.

Membership in the county farm bureau is about 4,600 people, down from 4,900 people at this time a year ago. The bureau offers members insurance, advocacy, education and other benefits.
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