Teen remembers mom with T-shirts
by Lindsay Field
lfield@cherokeetribune.com
November 21, 2012 12:39 AM | 1744 views | 0 0 comments | 6 6 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Kirbe Bostick, 15, and her father, Keith Bostick, sit in Glover Park as she wears the shirt that she designed as part of her International Baccalaureate personal project in honor of her mother who died from breast cancer in March. Kirbe sold over 200 of the shirts and donated the proceeds to the American Cancer Society.
Kirbe Bostick, 15, and her father, Keith Bostick, sit in Glover Park as she wears the shirt that she designed as part of her International Baccalaureate personal project in honor of her mother who died from breast cancer in March. Kirbe sold over 200 of the shirts and donated the proceeds to the American Cancer Society.
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MARIETTA — A Marietta High School sophomore has raised $2,500 for the American Cancer Society in honor of her mother, who died this year after a five-year battle with breast cancer.

Kirbe Bostick’s 46-year-old mother, Roslyn Bostick, died March 30. Three weeks later, the sophomore decided that she would do a fundraiser and photo shoot for her International Baccalaureate Personal Project at Marietta.

Between April and mid-November, Bostick set up a photo shoot for supporters of breast cancer awareness calling it the “Pink Shoot” — organized a business plan to create and market T-shirts with three different designs and sold more than 200 of them to MHS students and staff, raising $2,500 for the cause.

“It was awesome, almost surreal that I could actually do that by myself,” she said. “It says a lot about what one person can do to change something.”

This venture was also the first time Bostick had ever raised money for any organization.

“I hadn’t really done anything that involved leadership before, so talking to business people was hard,” she said.

She used websites to design shirts, market them and figure out the best ways to conduct a photo shoot of her peers wearing the shirts.

Bostick’s three shirt designs consisted of the sayings “I believe in Pink,” a quote from movie star Audrey Hepburn; “I Pink I can! I Pink I can!”; and “Pink-y Promise.”

Bostick presented a check to the American Cancer Society and showed classmates, parents and teachers a slideshow of her photo shoot on Nov. 12 during the school’s annual Personal Project Showcase.

Her father, Keith Bostick, said the project was quite a journey for his daughter.

“She came to me with really just this one idea and effort to honor her mother and at the same time promote awareness related to breast cancer,” he said. “I wanted it to be her project, so I helped set the parameters about the path.”

Keith Bostick said the project taught his daughter business skills and how to complete a project from start to finish.

“It took on and ran like wild fire,” he said. “I was really extremely proud of her on many fronts. She is kind of quiet and reserved, so she has that quiet strength. I wanted to see it manifest itself, her leadership capabilities and skills. It also was a very cathartic as it relates to closure with her mother.”

He hopes his daughter’s project is a catalyst for others to join in the fight against breast cancer.

“One of the things that (Roslyn) always wanted was to make sure that her girls saw that she didn’t give up. She was a fighter,” he said. “(Kirbe’s) concept of the Pink-y Promise was extremely significant. We all promise to help and help support people through this journey, but the Pink-y Promise is a more committed promise.”

Kelly Herrero, Marietta High’s personal project coordinator, said Kirbe Bostick was one of 93 students who completed projects this year.

To receive an IB Seal of Education on their high school transcript, students must complete a personal project and at least 20 hours of community service by their sophomore year.

“The personal project is the culminating event in their middle years education and pulls together all the themes and curriculum of grades six through 10 into one cohesive demonstration of their education,” she said.

At Marietta, they encourage students to choose a project that aligns with their interests and stretches them outside their comfort zones.

“We hope that each student finds a lesson in their project that challenges their understanding of themselves, their strengths and their own weaknesses,” Herrero said. “Kirbe’s project epitomizes all of those gracefully.”
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