High-stakes trial begins for 2010 Gulf oil spill
by Michael Kunzelman, Associated Press
February 25, 2013 11:05 AM | 241 views | 0 0 comments | 2 2 recommendations | email to a friend | print
In this June 15, 2010 file photo, a member of Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal's staff wearing a glove reaches into thick oil on the surface of the northern regions of Barataria Bay in Plaquemines Parish, La. The Gulf oil spill settlement trial has started in New Orleans, Monday, Feb. 25, 2013. U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier is scheduled to hear several hours of opening statements Monday by lawyers for the companies, federal and state governments and others who sued over the disaster. Barbier is hearing the case without a jury. The trial is designed to identify the causes of BP's well blowout and assign percentages of fault to the companies. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
In this June 15, 2010 file photo, a member of Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal's staff wearing a glove reaches into thick oil on the surface of the northern regions of Barataria Bay in Plaquemines Parish, La. The Gulf oil spill settlement trial has started in New Orleans, Monday, Feb. 25, 2013. U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier is scheduled to hear several hours of opening statements Monday by lawyers for the companies, federal and state governments and others who sued over the disaster. Barbier is hearing the case without a jury. The trial is designed to identify the causes of BP's well blowout and assign percentages of fault to the companies. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)
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Gulf Oil Spill Trial Slideshow
In this Wednesday, May 5, 2010 file photo, A shrimp boat is used to collect oil with booms in the waters of Chandeleur Sound, La. The U.S. Justice Department and the five Gulf coast states most affected by a massive 2010 oil spill have all indicated they would like to reach a settlement on civil claims against BP PLC that would avoid a trial scheduled to start next week. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
view slideshow (8 images)
NEW ORLEANS (AP) — The high-stakes Gulf oil spill trial has started with a lawyer criticizing BP by saying company executives put enormous pressure on drilling managers to cut costs and rush the job.

Jim Roy is an attorney for individuals and businesses affected by the spill. He says BP repeatedly chose speed over safety.

The federal government and attorneys for a couple of Gulf coast states are also expected to make opening statements Monday. BP is also expected to present its side.

The trial is designed to assign blame and help figure out exactly how much more BP and other companies should pay for the nation’s worst offshore oil spill.

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