Odd News Roundup
August 09, 2013 09:45 AM | 395 views | 0 0 comments | 17 17 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Report: Fake officer stopped real police agents

LAS VEGAS, N.M. (AP) — Authorities say a man driving a truck with police lights on top made a crucial misstep during a bogus police stop in northern New Mexico.

Police say the two men he pulled over for speeding were real state police agents in an unmarked vehicle.

According to New Mexico State Police, 26-year-old John Shelton, of Logan, was arrested Wednesday following the sham traffic stop in San Miguel County.

Investigators say Shelton had a pistol on his hip and told the agents he was a member of the New Mexico State Police Search and Rescue and a trained law enforcement officer — something officials later discovered wasn't true.

Shelton is facing charges of impersonating an officer.

It was not clear if Shelton had an attorney.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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Pennsylvania man wins sideburns contest honoring Navy hero

ERIE, Pa. (AP) — The winner has been named in a Pennsylvania sideburns contest that honors a U.S. Navy commodore known for his impressive facial hair.

The Erie Times-News reports that 56-year-old Dave Baxter, of Lake City, Pa., topped 19 contestants on Wednesday evening. Officials say one contestant dropped out because he recently got a new job, had to move and was required to shave.

Contestants were asked to show their patriotic spirit by growing sideburns most like those of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry.

Baxter says he researched images of Perry to try and match the hero who commanded a nine-ship American fleet to victory over the British in the Battle of Lake Erie in 1813. Historical portraits suggest that Perry wore long mutton-chop sideburns that extended toward his lips.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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All-boys club: Michigan couple welcomes 12th son

By Ed White, Associated Press

DETROIT (AP) — A western Michigan family welcomed their 12th child. And, shocker, it's a boy — just like the other 11.

Jay and Kateri Schwandt of Rockford believed the latest baby might break the gender streak, especially after Kateri, known as Teri, was nine days past her due date. That was unusual for her pregnancies. But as it turned out, it was hardly a game-changer as a nurse at a Grand Rapids hospital announced delivery of another boy.

Tucker was 7 pounds, 12 ounces.

"Of course. There was a chuckle in the whole room," Teri, 38, said told The Associated Press on Thursday. "I looked at my husband, and we exchanged a knowing smile. When they say it's a boy, I think, OK, no problem. I've got this. We know what we're doing."

Tyler is the oldest son at 21. When the school year starts, three Schwandt boys will be in high school, while five brothers are in lower grades. That leaves three more at home with Teri.

The Schwandts, who live north of Grand Rapids, consider themselves devout Roman Catholics who don't believe in using birth control and put the size of their family in God's hands. Teri comes from a family of 14 kids. But she's not the only member of her own family committed to the cause.

She has a sister in the Detroit area, Kate Osberger, who has 10 children of her own. Yep, all sons.

"That's amazing. This is a miracle," said Dr. Bob Barbieri, who researches fertility issues and is chairman of obstetrics and gynecology at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. "It appears there is some type of genetic determination in some families that have a lot of girls or a lot of boys. It's not well understood. It's more than a statistical oddity."

A large brood brings many challenges, regardless of gender.

Daily trips to the grocery store and usually a weekly stop at a warehouse store when possible. School lunches can mean going through an entire loaf of bread each day. The Schwandts have a 15-passenger van — "the big bus" — that carries the clan to family gatherings and Sunday Mass. It helps that some boys are old enough to drive.

"I'll call and say I'm stuck. I need you to pick up Wesley from preschool," Teri said. "There aren't too many kids who get to know the preschool teacher."

At home, half of the 12 sleep in two bedrooms with bunk beds. Teri has a rule of no more than one pair of shoes for each kid in the entryway. Once the boys hit sixth grade, they do their own laundry.

"Someone's responsible for unloading the dishwasher and loading it. Someone vacuums the stairs," said Jay, 39, who has a land surveying business. "We heat the house with wood. We're cutting wood, hauling it and stacking it. They may not like it but they know they need to pitch in."

Teri said she's only known the gender of two babies before they were born. Believing a girl might arrive this time, the family settled on Jaynie for a name, a play on Jay's name. It wasn't needed, of course.

"He would love a little girl," Teri said. "He's never done a daddy-daughter dance."

Maybe he'll still get the chance.

"Possibly," Teri said of more children. "We never close that door."

Follow Ed White.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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Black bear breaks into Idaho kitchen

KETCHUM, Idaho (AP) — A black bear in search of a late-night snack broke into an Idaho house and licked leftover Chinese food from a cast iron pan on the stove.

David Edwards of Ketchum tells the Idaho Mountain Express that his dog's barking awakened him around 3 a.m. Monday.

When he went to investigate what had his dog so upset, he saw the bear on its hind legs, paws on the stove, licking a pan.

Edwards' wife, Sara, had fallen asleep on the couch, so he woke her up and led her into the bedroom without telling her about the furry dish washer.

He says she would have "lost her mind" because she gets upset over spiders.

Edwards went back into the kitchen to find the bear gone and the pan clean.

Information from: Idaho Mountain Express, http://www.mtexpress.com

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press.

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