Boston gangster Bulger transferred to Oklahoma
December 17, 2013 11:15 AM | 206 views | 0 0 comments | 0 0 recommendations | email to a friend | print
This June 23, 2011 booking file photo provided by the U.S. Marshals Service shows gangster James "Whitey" Bulger. Federal prosecutors argued Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013 that Bulger "deserves no mercy” and asked a judge to sentence him to two consecutive life sentences, plus five years, in a string of murders and extortions. Bulger, the 84-year-old former leader of the notorious Winter Hill Gang, was convicted in August after spending more than 16 years on the run. (AP Photo/ U.S. Marshals Service, File)
This June 23, 2011 booking file photo provided by the U.S. Marshals Service shows gangster James "Whitey" Bulger. Federal prosecutors argued Thursday, Nov. 7, 2013 that Bulger "deserves no mercy” and asked a judge to sentence him to two consecutive life sentences, plus five years, in a string of murders and extortions. Bulger, the 84-year-old former leader of the notorious Winter Hill Gang, was convicted in August after spending more than 16 years on the run. (AP Photo/ U.S. Marshals Service, File)
slideshow
BOSTON (AP) — Former Boston crime boss James "Whitey" Bulger was moved to a federal prison in Oklahoma on Monday, although it was not immediately clear why.

The 84-year-old Bulger was being held at FTC Oklahoma City, according to Chris Burke, a spokesman for the federal Bureau of Prisons. The facility is a transfer point and its mission is to house inmates as they are moved between prisons, Burke said. He would not say where Bulger is ultimately headed, citing Bureau of Prisons policy.

Prosecutors in Tulsa, Okla., have been deciding whether to move forward with a first-degree murder charge against Bulger in the 1981 killing of businessman Roger Wheeler. Bulger was convicted by a federal jury in Boston earlier this year of killing Wheeler and 10 others. He was sentenced to two life terms.

Last month, Tulsa County District Attorney Tim Harris told the Tulsa World that prosecutors would take into consideration Bulger's federal sentence as they decide whether to try him.

Wheeler's daughter, Pam, has said she didn't want Bulger extradited to Tulsa, saying it would be a waste of taxpayer money.

"It took this long to come to a partial resolution. Just let it end there," she told the Tulsa World in August.

Federal prosecutors in Boston, the Tulsa district attorney, Bulger's attorneys and Wheeler's son and his attorney did not immediately return messages seeking comment. Spokesmen for the U.S. Marshals Service in Oklahoma City and Tulsa said they had no information on why Bulger was transferred.

Bulger was moved out of Massachusetts to a federal prison Brooklyn, N.Y., in November.

A federal judge in Boston last week ordered Bulger to pay $6 million in restitution to Wheeler's family. The mobster previously was ordered to pay $19.5 million in restitution to his other victims' families and forfeit $25 million to the government.

Investigators found $822,000 in cash stashed in his apartment walls when he was caught in Santa Monica, Calif., after more than 16 years on the run.



Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Comments
(0)
Comments-icon Post a Comment
No Comments Yet
*We welcome your comments on the stories and issues of the day and seek to provide a forum for the community to voice opinions. All comments are subject to moderator approval before being made visible on the website but are not edited. The use of profanity, obscene and vulgar language, hate speech, and racial slurs is strictly prohibited. Advertisements, promotions, spam, and links to outside websites will also be rejected. Please read our terms of service for full guides