Summer schools provide students with extra credits
July 04, 2014 12:36 AM | 2355 views | 0 0 comments | 9 9 recommendations | email to a friend | print
Jennifer Tercero-Raymundo completes an ‘edible cell’ in a lesson about plant and animal cells. Students built their own cell using food items. <br> Special to the Tribune
Jennifer Tercero-Raymundo completes an ‘edible cell’ in a lesson about plant and animal cells. Students built their own cell using food items.
Special to the Tribune
slideshow
Jennifer Szekeresh stretches out her pink ‘GAK,’ which is a mixture of Elmer’s glue, water and Borax soap and is a popular scientific creation of rubbery slime. Students made GAK as part of a science lesson on chemical bonds. <br> Special to the Tribune
Jennifer Szekeresh stretches out her pink ‘GAK,’ which is a mixture of Elmer’s glue, water and Borax soap and is a popular scientific creation of rubbery slime. Students made GAK as part of a science lesson on chemical bonds.
Special to the Tribune
slideshow
Kory Hughes displays his GAK. <br> Special to the Tribune
Kory Hughes displays his GAK.
Special to the Tribune
slideshow
High Touch, High Tech visited the summer classes at Canton ES STEM Academy and brought its ‘Body Shop’ program, allowing students to view and touch major mammal organs. Leida Puac Hernandez examines one of the organs. <br> Special to the Tribune
High Touch, High Tech visited the summer classes at Canton ES STEM Academy and brought its ‘Body Shop’ program, allowing students to view and touch major mammal organs. Leida Puac Hernandez examines one of the organs.
Special to the Tribune
slideshow
More than 1,300 students took advantage of Cherokee County School District Summer School opportunities for academic remediation, high school credit recovery or to take additional high school classes during June, Cherokee County spokeswoman Barbara Jacoby said.

Title I schools have a greater number of students receiving free or reduced lunch, Jacoby said, noting about 200 elementary and middle school students attended Title I program sessions this summer.

“At Title I schools, (students) perhaps don’t have as much support at home, so they’re getting more support at school,” Jacoby said. “Our main focus is remediation and providing opportunity to review material from the last year and for the upcoming year.”

Two campuses host the Title I programs, Jacoby said, with one centrally located at Canton Elementary School Science Technology Engineering Mathematics Academy and another at Oak Grove Elementary School Fine Arts Academy in the south end of the county.

About 100 additional students attended special education programs at Canton Elementary School. About 200 rising ninth-graders participated in bridge programs, where students had an opportunity before the start of freshman year to earn credit for core classes failed during the academic year.

About 300 high school students took advantage of credit recovery opportunities in June to retake classes they had not passed during the school year.

Another 450 high school students took classes at the Woodstock High and Cherokee High school campuses for initial credit.

The high school summer school program is open to students who need to take credit recovery classes, as well as students who want to “move on when ready,” Jacoby said. “These same opportunities are offered to them through CCSD’s other alternative choices for high school students including ACE Academy (daytime program), Polaris Evening Program and C3 Academy (online).”

Of the 22 high school and Polaris Evening Program students who completed diploma requirements during the summer session, 14 participated in the graduation ceremony June 27 at Woodstock High School.

School Board Member Patsy Jordan delivered the commencement address, and graduates were congratulated by Jordan and Assistant Superintendent Bill Sebring. Teacher Susan Greene, who taught many of the students through the Polaris Evening Program and High School Summer School program, also gave an inspirational speech, Cherokee County School District Coordinator Carrie McGowan said, noting the majority of students plan to continue their education at a university, technical college or by joining a branch of service in the United States military.

“Parents and family members were beaming with pride and shedding happy tears as the tassels were turned by the graduates,” Jordan said. “Many of these students aren’t traditional, and to us, it’s an accomplishment that they graduated.”

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